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1090 Adventure 2018
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I almost had to call for backup yesterday simply for the need of a 5mm allen key. As it happened, I sorted it with a bit of twisting and pulling! Is there supposed to be any kind of toolkit with the 1090 Adventure? There is no mention of it in the handbook which seems odd. Having said that, if there is supposed to be one, where on earth is it meant to be stored?

What does everyone else do regarding carrying emergency tools? I know there are several aftermarket tool rolls out there but I don't have luggage on my bike and I'm not really looking to be carrying a rucksack etc just so I can lug a few tools around.
 

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The bike should have included a tool kit when it was sold.

As to where you put it, there's no storage compartment where it will fit from the factory. A common modification is to delete the charcoal canister that sits in the tail and use that space. Rottweiler has a nice kit to delete the canister and the air valve doodad attached to the cylinders.

I use the stock toolkit but added tire repair tools, some vice grips and a few other things.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
 

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1090 Adventure 2018
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6 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The bike should have included a tool kit when it was sold.

As to where you put it, there's no storage compartment where it will fit from the factory. A common modification is to delete the charcoal canister that sits in the tail and use that space. Rottweiler has a nice kit to delete the canister and the air valve doodad attached to the cylinders.

I use the stock toolkit but added tire repair tools, some vice grips and a few other things.

Sent from my Pixel 5 using Tapatalk
That‘s useful, thank you. So, what exactly is that ‘charcoal box‘ for? Aird valve doodad?
 

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Evap canister is for emissions. Captures fumes from the fuel tank. I ditched mine too have room for the toolkit.


The other thing is the "SAS" can't recall what it stands for, but it's job is to suck hot air out of the engine and use it to warm up the cat or something when the bike is cold, also for emissions. Personal opinion, I don't like having exposed rubber hoses that could allow dirty air to go directly into the engine sitting around. The removal involved corking off a couple of hoses and bolting on block off plates.

About a 45 minute job for both and the parts are pretty cheap from Rottweiler.
 
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